Fraser Island
Rain Forest on Fraser Island

Rain Forest on Fraser Island

Fraser Island is the largest sand island in the world. It stretches approximately 120kms north/south and just over 20kms across at the widest point.

There are more than 100 fresh water lakes on the island with clear water just waiting for swimmers, although a few lakes are tea coloured and some are quite blue (but all are still very swimmable). The island has a wide botanical diversity ranging from heath type land to rainforest – even on the sand dunes!

Beach and Sand Dunes

Beach and Sand Dunes

Tag-Along 4WD Tours from Hervey Bay are available through a number of companies and overnight safaris are also a popular way of seeing the island.

More information about tourist features and accommodation can be found through the Fraser Coast Tourism website. For information specific to our special places of interest look at our individual pages for Maryborough and it’s attractions, or otherwise for information on Hervey Bay.

The wreck of the Maheno

The wreck of the Maheno

There is just one ship wreck (SS Maheno) easily accessible on the beach which doubles as the islands main road, and there are several others which are suitable for diving; the sand blows are a sight to behold but beware when sliding down the dunes!

Fraser Island is accessible from a number of points. Car and passenger ferries depart several times daily from River Heads just south of Hervey Bay to Kingfisher Bay Resort, and from Tin Can Bay at the southern end of the Great Sandy Strait. The ferries take approximately 40 minutes to cross from River heads, and some 45 minutes from Tin Can Bay to the southern end of Fraser Island.

Access by air is also available with aircraft landing on the island’s beach. On the island there is a wide range of accommodation from tents to tenaments in the form of hotels, guest houses and resorts. Four Wheel Driving is very popular on the island and necessary if you want to travel the island.

Pure breed Fraser Island Dingo

Pure breed Fraser Island Dingo

The survival of the Fraser Island dingoes relies on three management factors—education, engineering and enforcement. Fraser Island dingoes are part of the island ecology, and are protected by law.

The dingo Canis lupus dingo is protected in Queensland national parks as a native species. The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service has a legal responsibility to conserve these populations on national parks and protected areas, even though the dingo is a declared pest outside of these areas.